The thought of exercising can be repulsive to the average couch potato. It can seem impossible to the person whose body is fatigued, painful and tired. Don't worry, I would never encourage you to jump right into aerobics or P90X. We're going to start with baby steps. Be sure to check with your doctor before starting a workout program.

First, let's stop calling it exercise. Too much negativity is tied to that word. Let's just move. There are so many benefits to moving.

  • Improves your risk cardiovascular disease, hypertension, colon cancer and diabetes

  • Maintains healthy bones, muscles and joints (and swelling with arthritis)

  • Helps control weight, builds lean muscle and reduces body fat

  • Reduces symptoms of anger, aggression and depression

Find something fun and sweaty to do. If you don't enjoy it, don't do it. Here are some moving ideas:

  • Walk. Start walking as long and as fast as is comfortable and gradually work up to more.

  • Ride a bike.

  • Play ball with your kids.

  • Hit the ball around on the tennis court.

  • Try zumba.

  • Go swimming.

  • Play volleyball or badminton

  • Roller skating or blading

  • Work in the garden

  • Clean your house

Just move! Try to increase the time and intensity of your movement as you're able. Be sure to have fun and add variety so you'll stick with it. You won't regret it!

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER

This content is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of such advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Cynthia A. Barrington nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.